2015-10 140L JdeMontreal RGBEvery Monday since October 24, 2005, Richard Béliveau, Ph.D., publishes a column in the section Votre Vie (Your Life) in the Journal de Montréal in which he describes the latest developments on maintaining health through diet in an easy-to-read and engaging style. Thanks to the generosity of the Journal de Montréal, you can download and consult all of the columns in high resolution PDF format from our website.

Chroniques Prévention

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Metastases: the role of saturated fats

A study has shown that the metastases from several different types of cancers are derived from subpopulations of tumor cells which express the fatty acid receptor CD36 at their cell surface. The activation of this receptor by a saturated fat that is ubiquitous in modern diets (palmitate) stimulates the formation of these metastases, suggesting that an excess of saturated fats in the diet could play an important role in the evolution of cancer. Download the column

The cavemen loved their vegetables

The recent discovery of a very large amount of residue from edible plants at an archaeological site dating from about 800,000 years ago suggests that the menu of prehistoric people was much more diversified than had been thought and that plants constituted the basis of their diet. Download the column

Migraines with bacterial origins?

A surprising observation suggests that the mouths of people who suffer from migraines possess a bacterial flora that favours the production of nitric oxide, a molecule known to trigger headaches. Download the column

Raynaud’s phenomenon: poor adaptation to the cold

Raynaud’s phenomenon is caused by excessive constriction of arteries in the extremities (fingers, feet, ears) in response to cold, which blocks the circulation of blood. A defect in metabolic adaption which is very painful, but without real danger! Download the column

Better understanding of the cognitive troubles associated with cancer

Patients who have undergone chemotherapy for treating cancer often exhibit cognitive dysfunction following treatment. According to a recent study, these cognitive problems could be a consequence of increased levels of inflammatory molecules which compromise the activity of neurons. Download the column

Fils d'actualité

Richard Béliveau

News Flash!

Much more than just a simple way to stay in shape, recent research has shown that regular physical exercise turns out to be as effective as some medications for reducing mortality in people affected by certain heart diseases or diabetes. Download this column.